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20121205
20121213
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around. welcome to rivenrock gardens, just outside of nipomo. farmer john dicus came up with the idea, and the rest, as they say, is history. >> it's really healthy. it's an environmentally friendly type plant. it doesn't require quite as much water, nutrients as another plant would for the same amount of food value that you get from it. it's a healthy plant. we eat it for ourselves just for the health that it gives. so it seemed to be a natural plant to share. > though they may look the same to us, there are actually about 400 varieties of cacti, and while not all are edible, john does grow an edible variety called nopalea grande. during peak season, he is shipping upwards of 3,000 pounds of the plant at a time, and while some go to pet-food stores for tortoises to enjoy, most of the plants here are used for human consumption. so john has a grading system he uses when harvesting. >> we have several different grades, depending on what the consumer wants. this is grade-a, tender, beautiful, exquisite, baby-vegetable cactus, shipped with ultimate care in packing. this would be grade-b,
on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting thelace where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who could afford to escape the city heat and spend summers at the shore. homer's relatives on both sides had been engaged in shipping and trading for generations. his father, charles savage homer, carried on an import business. his mother, henrietta benson homer, was a watercolorist whose flower pictures were occasionally shown in professional exhibitions. winslow was born in boston in 1836. at the age of 21, after two years of drudgery apprenticeto a commercial lithographer, he vowed he would never have another mast
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2